vRealize Log Insight 4.6 – April 2018 New Release

vRealize Log Insight 4.6 – April 2018 New Release

vRealize Log Insight 4.6 – April 2018 New Release

Check out the newest release of vRealize Log Insight 4.6! This release includes new features for the Log Insight server and agent, resulting in improvements in scalability, usability, and user access management. Improved Scalability Log Insight is now more scalable and supports up to 15 vCenters per node. It also supports sending SYSLOG over UPD. The post vRealize Log Insight 4.6 – April 2018 New Release appeared first on VMware Cloud Management .


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New KB articles published for week ending 25th…

New KB articles published for week ending 25th March 2018

New KB articles published for week ending 25th…

VMware vSphere Integrated Containers VCH creation wizard does not list any vSphere distributed switches in the dropdown list Date Published: 2018/03/19 VMware NSX for vSphere eBGP between DLR and Edge may experience a routing loop after upgrading to NSX-v 6.3.5 Date Published: 2018/03/20 VMware vCloud Availability for vCloud Director RabbitMQ login is refused when configuring […] The post New KB articles published for week ending 25th March 2018 appeared first on Support Insider .


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What’s New in vRealize Automation 7.4

What’s New in vRealize Automation 7.4

What’s New in vRealize Automation 7.4

Making Clouds Invisible – Usability and Time to Value (TTV) Take a Front seat Fasten your seatbelt – What’s New in vRealize Automation 7.4 Hybrid cloud is a reality that imposes the need to be app-aware, self-driving and fully automated. The advent of containers, PaaS, and FaaS frameworks are driving faster, scalable and portable application development. Infrastructure and The post What’s New in vRealize Automation 7.4 appeared first on VMware Cloud Management .


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Becoming a vSAN Specialist: Section 3 – vSAN…

Becoming a vSAN Specialist: Section 3 – vSAN Configuration | TheVirtualBoi

Becoming a vSAN Specialist: Section 3 – vSAN…

In this section, I will go over the following objectives found within the VMware vSAN Specialist Blueprint: Objective 3.1 – Identify physical network requirements Objective 3.1 – Identify physical network requirements Let’s start with the network basics. Dedicated network port for vSAN traffic 10GB (dedicated or shared) highly recommended, required for all flash deployments)


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Announcing the vSphere 6.5 Update 1 Security…

Announcing the vSphere 6.5 Update 1 Security Configuration Guide

Announcing the vSphere 6.5 Update 1 Security…

I am really pleased to announce the availability of the 6.5 Update 1 Security Configuration Guide (SCG). Normally a new guide is done only for numbered releases and not updates but the number of security updates that have made it into 6.5 Update 1 has warranted this SCG release. Also, we want to show how The post Announcing the vSphere 6.5 Update 1 Security Configuration Guide appeared first on VMware vSphere Blog .


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HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 3: Tests and Results

Tests

Once you hit the “Test” button you can go watch some movies. It’s take a time depend on your HW. For me it was couple of hours.

  • It starts with VM deployment

  • It will create bunch of VM’s (each 4vCPU, 4GB of RAM, 9xHDD (total 250GB))

Testing was done by using Vdbench VM with input argument “-fvdb-8vmdk-100ws-4k-70rdpct-100randompct-8threads

Results

Tested VSAN configuration:

  • 4x Node configuration with 10gigabit connection
  • VC build: VMware vCenter Server 6.5.0 build-7515524

Each ESXi host:

  • Build: VMware ESXi 6.5.0 build-7388607
  • CPU: Intel(R) Xeon(R) Silver 4114 CPU @ 2.20GHz ( Packages: 2, Cores: 20 )
  • Memory: 256 GB
  • Server vendor/model: Dell Inc. PowerEdge FC640
  • VSAN Disks:
    • SSD: Local TOSHIBA Disk (naa.58ce38ee2000c0ad)
      • TOSHIBA PX05SMB080Y
      • 800 GB
    • SSD: Local TOSHIBA Disk (naa.58ce38e06c8a274d)
      • TOSHIBA PX05SRB192Y
      • 1920 GB
    • SSD: Local TOSHIBA Disk (naa.58ce38e06c8a26fd)
      • TOSHIBA PX05SRB192Y
      • 1920 GB
    • SSD: Local TOSHIBA Disk (naa.50000397cc89cd79)
      • TOSHIBA PX05SMB080Y
      • 800 GB
  • After Vdbench testing is finished, the results are collected from all VM’s. And you can view the result at

    http://<YOUR_BENCHMARK2_IP>:8080/results/

  • And go through the easy-run-* directories and click on first *.txt file

  • In the .TXT file is summary results

In this saved .zip file are also the graphs with more details. Same what you can see on web http://<YOUR_BENCHMARK2_IP>:8080/results/

Graphs

Just few of them..


Per disk


Almost in each graph section you can click and get full graphs.

Text results

Also on a web and in the .ZIP file are result in text form…

Copyright (c) 2000, 2016, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Vdbench distribution: vdbench50406 Wed July 20 15:49:52 MDT 2016
For documentation, see 'vdbench.pdf'.
16:52:41.075 Created output directory '/root/vdbench/output'
16:52:41.106 input argument scanned: '-fvdb-8vmdk-100ws-4k-70rdpct-100randompct-8threads'
16:52:41.170
16:52:41.171 Adjusted default JVM count for host=localhost from jvms=1 to jvms=8 because of iorate=max and a total of 8 sds.
16:52:41.171
16:52:41.311 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-10-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-0 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.333 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-11-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-1 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.363 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-12-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-2 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.385 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-13-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-3 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.408 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-14-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-4 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.432 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-15-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-5 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.470 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-16-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-6 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:41.504 Starting slave: /root/vdbench/vdbench SlaveJvm -m localhost -n localhost-17-180314-16.52.41.043 -l localhost-7 -p 5570 -d86
16:52:42.427 All slaves are now connected
16:52:45.108 Starting RD=run1; I/O rate: Uncontrolled MAX; elapsed=3600 warmup=1800; For loops: None

Mar 14, 2018 interval i/o MB/sec bytes read resp read write resp resp queue cpu% cpu%  rate 1024**2 i/o pct time resp resp max stddev depth sys+u sys
16:52:46.275 1 8869.00 34.64 4096 70.24 3.055 2.808 3.639 312.221 12.932 27.3 22.5 4.2
16:52:47.047 2 27285.00 106.58 4096 69.45 2.133 1.826 2.830 29.948 3.173 58.3 20.5 3.5
16:52:48.077 3 29975.00 117.09 4096 70.13 2.118 1.781 2.912 46.267 3.361 63.5 13.6 2.4
16:52:49.065 4 30425.00 118.85 4096 69.48 2.089 1.716 2.938 30.170 3.152 63.6 6.4 1.1
16:52:50.068 5 31824.00 124.31 4096 70.48 2.003 1.651 2.842 59.798 3.233 63.7 3.2 0.7
16:52:51.060 6 31044.00 121.27 4096 69.51 2.048 1.700 2.840 52.844 3.213 63.5 13.5 1.8
16:52:52.066 7 33020.00 128.98 4096 70.06 1.933 1.629 2.643 26.811 2.974 63.9 5.8 1.0
16:52:53.063 8 32574.00 127.24 4096 69.99 1.954 1.629 2.713 28.718 3.070 63.7 3.7 0.7
16:52:54.057 9 32823.00 128.21 4096 69.90 1.947 1.609 2.732 23.752 3.194 63.9 3.7 0.7
16:52:55.056 10 33120.00 129.38 4096 69.56 1.926 1.599 2.673 24.818 3.125 63.8 2.6 0.7
16:52:56.051 11 32846.00 128.30 4096 69.28 1.928 1.639 2.580 24.851 2.875 63.4 3.8 1.0
16:52:57.059 12 32356.00 126.39 4096 69.44 1.976 1.672 2.669 30.840 3.177 63.8 2.6 0.3
16:52:58.080 13 34012.00 132.86 4096 69.92 1.905 1.575 2.670 28.106 3.177 64.8 2.0 0.7
16:52:59.057 14 33399.00 130.46 4096 70.01 1.877 1.570 2.594 38.115 3.134 62.6 3.6 1.6
.
.

Related parts:

HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 1: Installation
HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 2: Configuration
HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 3: Tests and Results

Which policy changes can trigger a rebuild on…

Which policy changes can trigger a rebuild on vSAN?

Which policy changes can trigger a rebuild on…

Some time ago, I wrote about which policy changes can trigger a rebuild of an object. This came up again recently, as it was something that Duncan and I covered in our VMworld 2017 session on top 10 vSAN considerations. In the original post (which is over 3 years old now), I highlighted items like […] The post Which policy changes can trigger a rebuild on vSAN? appeared first on CormacHogan.com .


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HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 2: Configuration

Benchmark VM Configuration

Default configuration

  • Once the VM is deployed turn it on.
  • Go to your browser and navigate to your benchmark VM “Benchmark2” in my case. And enter your “root” password what you set during OVF deployment.http://<YOUR_BENCHMARK2_IP>:8080/

Continue reading “HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 2: Configuration”

NSX expert? Expand your knowledge and improve…

NSX expert? Expand your knowledge and improve deployment by registering for the upcoming episodes of our Getting More Out of NSX free webcast series: http://t.co/b0XXwR4Sk0 #RunNSX #TransformSecurity

NSX expert? Expand your knowledge and improve…

NSX expert? Expand your knowledge and improve deployment by registering for the upcoming episodes of our Getting More Out of NSX free webcast series: http://t.co/b0XXwR4Sk0 #RunNSX #TransformSecurity


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HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 1: Installation

What is HCI Bench

 

HCIBench stands for “Hyper-converged Infrastructure Benchmark”. It’s essentially an automation wrapper around the popular and proven VDbench open source benchmark tool that makes it easier to automate testing across a HCI cluster. HCIbench aims to simplify and accelerate customer POC performance testing in a consistent and controlled way. The tool fully automates the end-to-end process of deploying test VMs, coordinating workload runs, aggregating test results, and collecting necessary data for troubleshooting purposes.

HCIBench is not only a benchmark tool designed for vSAN, but also could be used to evaluate the performance of all kinds of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Storage in vSphere environment.

HomePage:
http://labs.vmware.com/flings/hcibench

User Guilde:
http://download3.vmware.com/software/vmw-tools/hcibench/HCIBench_User_Guide.pdf

 

 

Prerequisites

  • vSphere 5.5 environment or higher with vCenter (doesn’t support deployment on a standalone ESXi host).
  • Good to have DHCP on VLAN where the benchmark VM will be deployed.
  • vMotion configured

     

Installation

 

  • Select name and location for your VM

 

  • Review details

  • Accept license agreement
  • Select storage. Put it outside the VSAN datastore

  • Select destination network
    If there’s no DHCP Server on the VLAN which Vdbench client VMs will be deployed on, or the VLAN for Vdbench client VMs can not be routed from the Public Network, map this Network to the VLAN and Enable DHCP Service in the Web UI if needed

  • Customize the VM. As I am using DHCP in my LAB so all Network fileds are empty. And at the bottom enter your password for root.

  • Review configuration data before deployment

 

  • Hit “Finish” and watch progress in “Recent Tasks”

 

 
 

Related parts:

HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 1: Installation
HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 2: Configuration
HCI Bench – vSAN performance tool – Part 3: Tests and Results

 

 

Source: http://labs.vmware.com/flings/hcibench

5 Ways to Change Hostname of your ESXi host

5 Ways to Change Hostname of your ESXi host

5 Ways to Change Hostname of your ESXi host

This post is a quick recap of different ways to change a hostname of an ESXi host. There are different ways we work and different tools we use. Not every time we have the chance to use the tools we want, or we have an access directly to the server room or to the console. This […] Read the full post 5 Ways to Change Hostname of your ESXi host at ESX Virtualization .


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VMware Capacity Reporting Part IV: VVol…

VMware Capacity Reporting Part IV: VVol Capacity Reporting

VMware Capacity Reporting Part IV: VVol…

Storage capacity reporting seems like a pretty straight forward topic. How much storage am I using? But when you introduce the concept of multiple levels of thin provisioning AND data reduction into it, all usage is not equal (does it compress well? does it dedupe well? is it zeroes?). This multi-part series will break it … Continue reading VMware Capacity Reporting Part IV: VVol Capacity Reporting →


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VMware Cloud Foundation – Technical Overview…

VMware Cloud Foundation – Technical Overview Video for Cloud Foundation

VMware Cloud Foundation – Technical Overview…

See how VMware Cloud Foundation brings together the core SDDC building blocks of compute virtualization (with VMware vSphere), storage virtualization (with VMware vSAN) and network virtualization (with VMware NSX), together with the automation capabilities of the VMware SDDC Manager, into a new unified SDDC platform that provides a vastly simplified SDDC experience.


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Take Application Security to the Next Level –…

Take Application Security to the Next Level – VMware and Carbon Black team up

Take Application Security to the Next Level –…

Perhaps you’ve already begun to secure virtualized applications by rolling out micro-segmentation with NSX, but segmentation of the network is only the beginning to embracing least privilege in your environment. VMware has teamed up with Carbon Black to go beyond network protection and change the way your data center endpoints themselves The post Take Application Security to the Next Level – VMware and Carbon Black team up appeared first on Network Virtualization .


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